Menu

Types of Televisions

Televisions have changed a lot since their creation in the early 1900s. Apart from the televisions of today, TVs used something called a cathode ray tube to project static or moving images on a screen.AsdescribedbyWikipedia,acathode ray tube “is a vacuum tube containing an electron gun (a source of electrons) and a fluorescent screen, with internal or external means to accelerate and deflect the electron beam, used to create images in the form of light emitted from the fluorescent screen. The image may represent electrical waveforms (oscilloscope), pictures (television, computer monitor), radar targets and others.”

But as time went on, televisions became more sophisticated. Most tube TVs were large, bulky, box-shaped electronics, but the newer TVs took on a more flat appearance, looking more like picture frames than the standard television set that most were used to. In fact these new TVs became a lot like picture frames in that owners could mount them on the wall instead of setting themona TV stand. Not only that, but the use of the cathode ray tube was retired for newer technology that made the build sleeker. There are many new types of televisions out there. Each has their pros and cons, but allarerelatively sweet displays for any room.DLP Television Sets– Digital Light Processing was a technology created and owned by Texas Instruments. It uses something called a Digital Micromirror Device, or DMD chip, which essentially has over a million tiny mirrors that helps create the images on the screen. Each mirror replicates a pixel which creates the image.Pros:

  • The picture is vibrant and the light does not flicker, making it easier on the eyes.
  • Reflects light away from the screen, making darker colors rich.
  • The DMD chip creates brilliant action scenes that transition effortlessly.

Cons:

  • The light source for the TV has a limited lifespan. Each light source works for about 8000 hours; if you were to leave the TV on every day without turning it off, you would roughly have a year’s worth of watching. Replacement lamps can cost around $250.
  • The television will have to be viewed at eye level. If you mount it on the wall up high, you won’t be able to see it very well, the same goes it you have it lower in a stadium-type of view.

LED Back Lit LCD Television Sets– LED stands for Light Emitting Diode. The diode emits light as it conducts current, creating a very nice display for the TV. LED back lit LCD TVs also have a thinner panel and brighter display as well as consume less power and have better heat dissipation than a regular LCD TV.

Pros:

  • Brighter display than other flouresent bulb TVs.
  • Have better color consistency over time than regular LCD.
  • Have a better lifespan than regular LCD TVs.

Cons:

  • LEDs with local dimming use more energy than other LCDs.
  • These televisions can have larger cabinet depth making them less able to be wall-mounted.
  • They are more expensive than regular LCD TVs.

LCD Television Sets– Liquid Crystal Display is a type of display that utilizes light to create various images on the screen. Each LCD TV screen has millions of shutters that filter the white light with filters in order to create the correct color for the image on your TV screen.

Pros:

  • Needs low voltage to display.
  • Many LCD TVs have a non-reflective face.
  • Great from any angle.

Cons:

  • Has fast motion delay that may blur action scenes.
  • Have not reached the television sizes that Plasma has; biggest at 50 inches now.

PDP Television Sets– Plasma Display Panels create images by using millions of pixels that each have three sub-pixels for red, blue and green. These sub-pixels are controlled by “advanced electronics” that allow the pixels to emit over 16 million colors. As power is applied to the pixel, the gas inside the pixels reacts to create the right color though the plasma it creates.

Pros:

  • Stunning picture quality: deeper blacks and superior contrast ratio.
  • Wider viewing angles.
  • Less motion blur, higher response time and higher refresh rates.

Cons:

  • Heavier than LCD and smallest size is 37 inches.
  • Uses more power than a LCD Television.

The cathode ray tube TVs of the past are still very good TVs and many are still in working order. However with the growing popularity of these new flatter TV electronics, TV manufacturers have changed their product line-ups to consist exclusively of these types. Each set has its flaws, but all of them have utilized new technology to create sleeker electronics and better displays.